Maja Zagórska (PL)

Maja Zagórska (PL)

Maja Zagórska employs signs and symbols such as quotes, household items and self-portraits in order to comment on the joys and struggles of living in modern society. In her work she illustrates her personal highs, lows, and the attempts she makes to balance this private narrative. Through vivid drawings she shows the sometimes humorous, sometimes embarrassing, trivial, obsessive, or sentimental aspects of daily life. The details in her work are recognizable and often humoristic, paired with areas of color she emphasizes objects or situations we can all relate to.

Everyday_struggle_1_drawing_42,5x30cm_2014_20€_Maja_Zagorska_original

Everyday_struggle_2_drawing_42,5x30cm_2014_20€_Maja_Zagorska_original

December_drawing_44,5x32cm_2014_25€_Maja_Zagorska_original

Maja Zagórska (PL) by GHA

Zagórska first began to create art when she was 22 years old. Growing up in a non-artistic family she did not consider art as a career and conceptions about what art was supposed to look like kept her from making it. Zagórska explains that every time she did try to draw the result came out ugly. She studied journalism for three years but it did not suit her.

Zagórska felt restricted when she was told by supervisors to write things that had already been written. She was offered creativity within a framework of already set rules, and that was not enough. At that point Zagórska picked up drawing and went to her first art class in Poland. After doing research online she found Weißensee Kunsthochschule Berlin, applied and got accepted. Zagórska describes her experiences at Weißensee as life changing, realising that there is no such thing as an ugly drawing. She prefers paintings that are not perfect, when visible mistakes are part of the finished work.

When Zagórska discusses her art she implies that it does not have a big and important message because she considers herself to be a “pretty average person” who is not in a position to moralise people. Zagórska’s art is her diary, a way for her to make sense of her thoughts, to process them and learn more about herself. She employs signs and symbols such as quotes, household items and self-portraits in order to comment on the joys and struggles of living in modern society. In her work she illustrates her personal highs, lows, and the attempts she makes to balance this private narrative. Through vivid drawings she shows the sometimes humorous, sometimes embarrassing, trivial, obsessive, or sentimental aspects of daily life. The details in her work are recognizable and often humoristic, paired with areas of colour she emphasizes objects or situations we can all relate to.