Yumie Yamakawa (JP)

Yumie Yamakawa (JP)

In clean illustrations Yumie Yamakawa (JP) captures human reactions and emotions. She focuses on depicting comedic aspects within tragic situations.Her work bares references to both the japanese minimalistic style and European storytelling. The clean black lines -mask like faces- and the careful use of the color red capturing the essence of the story told, suggest a japanese influence combined with the long tradition in classical european storytelling, scenes that have been describing daily life for centuries.Yumie has developed her own unique artistic language, bypassed cultural differences, and creates a universal expression that let us relate and get lost in our own world.

Playing Cards-Joker

Plying Cards-Wealth

2012 Playing cards-spade

Playing Cards-Knowledge

2014 Language of flowers_Lupin flower

Playing Cards-Love

2014 Monster-Audience

2014 Monster-Baku

2014 Language of flowers-Christmas rose

Yumie Yamakawa (JP) Play-Building blocks - 2015 - 30x40 cm

Yumie Yamakawa (JP) Play-Doctors and nurses - 30x40 cm

Yumie Yamakawa (JP), vs-Ideal child - 30x40 cm

Yumie Yamakawa (JP), vs-Understanding each other - 30x40 cm

Yumie Yamakawa (JP), vs-Your love - 30x40 cm

Yumie Yamakawa (JP), Monster-Personal space - 2014 - 30x40 cm

Yumie Yamakawa (JP), What I have in common with the future - 2013 - 30x40 cm

About Yumie Yamakawa (JP) by (GHA)

Yumie Yamakawa is from Hyogo, a city in West Japan. With references to manga (typical japanese book illustrations) her clean illustrations capture human reactions and emotions. She focuses on depicting comedic aspects within tragic situations.

In Japan Yamakawa used to work as a waiter but it never suited her to work in an environment with other people. She would oftentimes feel stressed, melancholic and she would want to run away. In 2009 she began to make small illustrations to occupy her mind but never considered herself to be an artist. In 2012 Yamakawa’s husband, an artist, had to move to Berlin for work and she was happy to come along.  On the suggestion from her husband she began to create bigger illustrations, and got the opportunity to exhibit her first works. When being confronted with an audience she finally felt as an artist.

At home Yamakawa is constantly drawing. Her inspiration comes from discussions with friends, but also from what she mentions as her ‘sixth sense’. Suddenly she will find an artist that sparks her artistic imagination – subsequently she will consume all of their works in order to find inspiration. It has been Jan Švankmajer, Egon Schiele and Marilyn Manson to mention a few. Yamakawa’s work bares references to both the japanese minimalistic style and European storytelling.

In her works  japanese influences are combined with the long tradition in classical european storytelling and scenes describing daily life. Her clean black lines, mask-like faces and the careful use of the color red captures the essence of the stories told. Yamakawa has developed her own unique artistic language, bypassed cultural differences, and creates a universal expression that let us relate and get lost in our own world.